Smart Gardens for Smart Homes. New App to Revolutionise the Way We Garden.

smartgardens

The era of Smart Gardens has arrived. Image via Wired

Gardening, there’s an app for that. Smart Gardens for Smart Homes is nearly here.

A new kickstarter project promises to take all the guess work out of gardening and watering.

San Francisco soil scientist Jason Aramburu might have revolutionized the way we all garden, with the invention of a solar-powered garden sensor and watering system.

Its part of a smartphone app called Edyn. The Wi-Fi connected gardening system involves ground sensors, a water valve and solar powered system connected to the internet.

The system assesses soil nutrition and moisture and waters your plants based on ongoing sensitivity.

The sensor is pretty high tech indeed. The system also measures the ambient temperature of the soil, humidity, light intensity and even soil electrical properties.

The information is all sent to your smartphone app and put into context for the end user. The app informs the gardener about what plants are best to grow, when exactly to plant and not to plant, as ell as what other plants would work well together.

The app will also warn you if there is too much moisture in the soil, or if your garden soils are too acidic and what you can add to balance out your garden, like composts.

Put together, Edyn will produce a huge database of information about which plants grow well in various climates.

Edyn, the system for Smart Gardens.

Edyn, the system for Smart Gardens. Image via Edyn

Edyn was designed by Yves Béhar, who said the system will take the hobby of gardening into a new, data driven era.

“What we found was that people were not necessarily looking for something to do the work for them, but to give them a deeper understanding of their plants,” Behar said.

“The more insight we have into our plants, the easier it is for us to engage with them and nurture them.”

Meanwhile, Aramburu hopes his smart gardens invention will not just revolutionize the way we do our gardening, but it will help farmers and food gardeners around the world secure the food the world needs to keep up with population demands in a warming climate.

“We already do a really bad job of feeding the world and it’s only going to become more difficult,” Aramburu told Wired.com.

“I’m hoping this will become a tool to enable agriculture around the world, to help people grow their own food and increase food security.”

Check out Edyn on Kickstarter.

Video: Smart Gardens for Smart Homes, how Edyn works.

Author: Smart Homes for Living

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